Orangeville, ON (James Doan) If you have ever attended a model show and stood in awe of the quality of workmanship exhibited, then you will know that it is the modeller’s attention to detail that is responsible for making his creation something that stands out from the ordinary. Even if you are just starting out in modelling, you can go a long way towards achieving similar results by simply remembering to pay attention to the details.

The first thing that anyone notices about a car model is its paint job. A poorly painted car, even if it has the most accurately detailed engine and interior will surely suffer in comparison if the body paint work is poorly done. Be thorough, when you have finished your model be sure that every square inch has been painted. Modellers may forget to take care that areas such as hood edges or the inside of the body shell are properly painted. You should check your model carefully from every possible angle to be certain that you haven’t missed any spots. Someone else, like a judge, will always notice them quickly.

Trying to replicate taillight and headlight lenses on chromed parts is often difficult. The best way to resolve this to drill out the lens areas and replace them with translucent units from the parts box or with scratchbuilt lenses made from translucent sprue. For novices, there is an easier way to recreate taillight lenses. You can simply paint the lens area of the chromed part with several coats of clear red paint.

If you paint the backsides of head and taillight lenses with chrome paint before installing them, you can create a three-dimensional effect which will appear much more realistic than unpainted lenses.

While discussing chromed parts for automobiles, you will find that using metal foil will make better looking trim. Application is actually simple and the watchword is ‘be patient’. Work slowly when applying the foil to avoid tearing or crimping it. Carefully burnishing Bare-Metal foil in place with a soft, blunt object, such as a Q-Tip, will help prevent it from lifting when the finished model is handled. To give Bare-Metal foil a brushed metal look, gently scour it with a Scotch Brite pad while it is still on the carrier.