Orangeville, ON (James Doan) What is a box stock model? This is one of the most frequently asked questions concerning contests. While the parameters can differ from one contest to another, there are some points which remain consistent.

The basic definition of a box stock model is one that is painted and assembled solely from the kit inventory with no alterations and using no other parts either from the aftermarket, another kit or by scratchbuilding. All of the fundamental aspects of building are allowed and encouraged.. This includes sanding moulding seams, eliminating flash, removing and filling ejector pin marks and correcting sprue flaws. Any alterations beyond the fundamentals, however, are not allowed. You may not remove features like chrome trim and drip rails. You may not add such items, either. Certain organizations like the I.P.M.S. (International Plastic Modelers Society) allow exhaust pipes to be drilled out, but that is the only alteration that is allowed.

Products not included in the kit such as those used for assembling and finishing the model are allowed. Of course paint, putty and glue are the most obvious here, but most contests allow the use of metal foil on chrome trim and aftermarket decals or dry transfers. Some contest guidelines, such as those set forth by the I.P.M.S. allow simple masking tape seat belts and wire antennas. Photoetched scripts, trim or hardware on any part of the vehicle, however, will get you booted out of the Box Stock class. This goes for other aftermarket products as well, including resin and metal cast replacement parts. All it takes is one non-kit part – no matter how small or innocent – to kick the model into another category where it will compete with others that have a wealth of aftermarket goodies. Kitbashed and scratchbuilt parts are absolutely, positively not allowed.

Can a box stock vehicle be weathered? Certainly, but only with cosmetic mediums like paints and pastels. You cannot remove any plastic to make features like dents or rustouts as these are alterations to the kit parts. Can a high gloss paint job be rubbed out using a polishing kit? Certainly, since this is considered a fundamental of good modelling and is rewarded.

Box Stock classes were created to test a modeller’s fundamental skills. Since Box Stock rules can vary from contest to contest, there may be grey areas that could affect your entry. Get a copy of a club or organization’s Box Stock guidelines well in advance of the show so you can be sure your model is correct. Call the contest chairman if you are in doubt. Most contests require the kit’s instruction sheet to be displayed with the model to aid in judging. Be sure to bring these along.

Competing in the Box Stock class is a great place to start. Just make sure you play by the rules.