Orangeville, ON (James Doan) Every modeller, whether just beginning or one who has spent decades in the hobby, has a talent for some part of the discipline. Even if we aren’t all completely comfortable with every part, we can all learn from those who have skills that we don’t possess. The best way to learn is to watch someone who is an expert. It is possible to follow the expertise of skilled modellers by joining a model club, or if that is not possible, by surfing the web to appropriate modelling websites, or through the pages of the numerous modelling magazines currently available. Back issues can often be found at your local library.

If you select model kits based on your skills and the degree to which you want to get involved with researching and assembling the model, you will find you will get more enjoyment and satisfaction from each model you build. This level of commitment will determine whether the outcome is pleasurable, frustrating or even possibly doomed to failure.

Plastic model kits are available in a range of detail and complexity that can challenge but still allow for the modeller to succeed in completing a satisfactory model. Some kits are specifically designed for beginners. The Level 1 kits typically require no glue and have a minimum number of parts. Advanced kits have more complexity and a greater number of pieces. The complexity of sub-assemblies and smaller pieces add to their challenge. Also, kits can be enhanced with aftermarket resin or photoetched detail accessories. Preparation and assembly of these can require special skills and patience. Do not assume that just because a kit is plastic, it will be easy to build.

As you progress from kit to kit, work to develop your modelling skills. Strive to achieve a perfect fit and finish even with simple kits. The skills you learn will then allow you to complete more complex kits with assurance.