Orangeville, ON (James Doan) Before starting any modelling project, take a little time to research the actual subject. You will find that if you learn some extra history of the prototype, you will build a more detailed model.

Make sure you have all the tools you will need for the building session on hand before you begin. There’s nothing more frustrating than running out of X-Acto blades in the middle of a project or finding out your gloss black has dried up and you cannot continue building without it. Check your supplies for missing items and pick them up before beginning a project.

As you begin your kit, never twist parts off the parts tree. Carefully cut the piece off using a hobby knife or sprue cutter (diagonal cutting pliers). Cutting with these pliers leaves the least amount of damage to the piece being cut apart.

Every modeller has at one time dropped a minute piece on the floor and searched for it to no avail. Spread an old white bed sheet under your workbench before each modelling session. Should you drop something on the sheet, finding it will be easy.

Hold your hobby knife at a low angle (45 degrees or less) while cutting. Holding the knife too high will cause the blade to rip through the piece instead of cutting it.

No matter what type of modelling glue you use, painted parts won’t form a powerful bond unless you scrape the paint from the areas to be joined.

Place a large piece of industrial glass over your work area. Besides protecting your table from knife marks, paint spills wipe right off. You can remove super glue with a single-edged razor blade.

For a more correct looking model, don’t forget to remove the copyright and ejection pin marks on your chassis before you paint it.