Orangeville, ON (James Doan) In the time between purchasing your model kit and starting construction, allow yourself a chance to think about the ways you can make the project more than just an out of the box experience. Try organizing a “group build” where you and several of your fellow modellers all start with the same basic kit and each works to end up with a piece that is singularly their own.

If you are not overly concerned with maintaining complete accuracy in your construction, there is a lot of scope in kit bashing.

You can spend a lot of time in the conception of your project taking parts from other similar or even possibly unrelated kits to see what modifications are possible. The potential to try fitting a Viper engine into a Volkswagen or a P-38 drop tank onto a scratch built tricycle really opens up your modelling experience.

If you are building strictly for your own satisfaction, there are practically no limitations on the parameters of your project. Even if you stick to models of your favourite subjects, you can change the basic kit significantly with modelling tips that you have perfected over the years. The final amount of detail you add to your kit will be your decision.

If you are planning a project with an eye to entering it in a competition, familiarize yourself with the specific rules and guidelines set by the judging panel, to ensure that your project will be acceptable. Some contests have strict constraints on the allowable modifications, techniques and degree of kit bashing. Working to a set of rules is another way to challenge your modelling skills. The results are still a measure of your own knowledge, expertise, and creativity.

Whether the final result is something which few other people see or you proudly display it at a large venue, you will still have the personal satisfaction of having built it.