Orangeville, ON (James Doan) Need a realistic-looking shifter boot? Make your own by cutting the end from a rubber fishing lure. Drill a hole through it, paint it black, and slip it over the shifter.

Having trouble detailing an instrument panel? Take a photo of the actual car’s instrument panel, enlarge or reduce it with your Photoshop software, print it out and glue the sized piece to the dash.

Need chrome bezels and trim on your dash? Paint the entire dash silver. When that’s dry, paint the whole dash semigloss black. When the black is tacky, scrape it off the areas to be chrome. Be careful not to remove any chrome paint underneath by scraping too hard.

Add clear covers to an instrument panel by placing a drop of clear two-part ‘5-minute’ epoxy directly over the gauges. Use a round toothpick to deposit a blob into the gauge cavity.

To add more texture and depth to your model’s interior, dry brush the scrapings from a pastel pencil (that is slightly darker than the interior’s colour) into the recessed areas.

Seam binding tape can be used for scale seat belts. The buckles can be cut from thin sheet plastic, painted silver and glued on the ends of the belts.

Heat-shrink tubing, found at hardware stores, can be used for roll cage padding. Using a piece slightly larger than the cage’s diameter, slice it lengthwise and slip it over the roll cage. It will then return to its original shape. Use fine black thread soaked in super glue for the zip ties.

Make your own door lock buttons by drilling a hole in the proper location on the door panel. Cut a straight pin or insect mounting pin slightly longer than needed, dip the end in glue and mount it in the hole.